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Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Spring NEARC Conference! For tips on how to navigate this site, visit the "Helpful Info" section. To return to the NEARC website, go to: www.northeastarc.org/spring-nearc.html.

The schedule is subject to change (as of May 13, 2019). Please check back for updates.

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Monday, May 13
 

7:00pm

Pub Meet Up at Branch and Blade Brewery
Arriving early? Join us for a pre-conference drink at Branch and Blade Brewery

Monday May 13, 2019 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Offsite: Branch and Blade Brewery 17 Bradco St, Keene, NH 03431, USA
 
Tuesday, May 14
 

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

POSTER: Demographic Factors Influencing the Spatial Distribution of Lottery Store Cash Prize Payouts
AUTHORS: Sasha Powers, and another student, TBD.

ABSTRACT: Students were introduced to ArcGIS this year. They were given 3 data sets, each with over 1600 features, of lottery stores. Attributes included name, location, and total store prize payout ($) in 2017. Students were shown how to upload csv files to ArcMap, how to symbolize the data, and how to use proportional symbology. Students were then asked to use demographics to analyze the spatial distribution of stores that had above average prize payouts. Students were shown how to locate data layers from ArcGIS Online, how to filter the data, and how to use analysis tools such as Aggregate.Data. Students created a count of points data table to determine the % of above average payout stores located in census blockgroups characterized by one, two, or three attributes: '25% or more of the population is identified as minority, 25% or more of the households have an income below 65% of the 2010 state median, and/or 25% of the households include no one over the age of 14 who speaks English well or very well.' This data layer was called the MA Environmental Justice layer. Students found a disproportionate number of stores were found in these census blockgroups and that this phenomenon was 2-3 times greater than comparable stores in neighborhoods with high median income ($1000,000). Students noted that given this findings, the lottery as a revenue tool raises many questions for further discussion and analysis.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Evaluating Bias of FEMA’s Disaster Relief Aid After Hurricane Harvey
AUTHORS: Allison Brown, Eastern Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT: In August 2017, Hurricane Harvey struck the Gulf Coast of the United States and resulted in $125 billion in damages.  Recovery from a national disaster like this requires necessary mitigation strategies to occur for continued resiliency and sustainability of the community.  This is the primary goal of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which allocates funds at the discretion of the federal administration upon receiving a state governments’ appeal for disaster assistance. As such, FEMA distributed $1.5 billion in federal funds over the following year to the heaviest hit states including Texas and Louisiana. Although FEMA must abide by Section 308 and 309 of the Stafford Act which prohibits discrimination of funds based on race, disability, sex, English proficiency, home ownership or economic status, research has shown that FEMA has distributed funds unethically after natural disasters including Hurricane Katrina.  Thus, this study statistically and spatially analyzed whether socio-economic factors were significant in predicting the quantity of aid received.  Results of the multivariable regression analysis identified that the percent of people speaking one language at home (French) was significant in determining allocation of disaster relief per county, yet this only explained 2% of the observed disaster relief aid. Therefore, results suggest FEMA did not discriminate by the socio-economic factors; FEMA has demonstrated the effectiveness of incorporating new approaches to reach affected communities. In the future, FEMA should continue to implement Congress’s inclusive approach towards creating resilient communities when mitigating areas through the usage of disaster aid relief.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Expanding the CitiBike Share Program: A GIS Approach to Identifying Potential Locations for New Docks
AUTHORS: Vincent Saputo

ABSTRACT: In the past decade, bike sharing systems have become an integral component of the North American urban landscape. In New York City, most residents choose to forgo the automobile for a variety of reasons, and are reliant on walking, cycling, and public transit for daily travel. In 2013, the City of New York launched their bike sharing program, CitiBike. Ever since, the program has proved increasingly successful, servicing a wide range of New Yorkers and tourists alike, providing an efficient alternative to walking and public transit. Consequently, the City intends to expand the program to 40,000 bikes within the next few years. However, city residents have voiced concerns over the social equity of the program, as many docks are in the wealthiest areas of New York. Recent efforts have been taken to offer lower income residents the opportunity to participate in the bike share program, including offering a discounted monthly membership for residents of NYC Housing Authority properties and residents receiving food assistance. Now, as the program continues to expand, the City will need to account for a variety of factors when deciding where to locate their next set of CitiBike Docks. In line with the new equity goals of the CitiBike program, this project attempts to identify the most suitable locations for new docks through various GIS applications.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Exploring Relationships between Bird Song Characteristics and Satellite Data
AUTHORS: David Guerra*, Saint Anselm College; Jay Pitocchelli, Saint Anselm College; Connor Gilbert, Saint Anselm College

ABSTRACT: Geographic variation in mating signals of birds is of interest to evolutionary biologists because the consequences of spatial divergence may lead to behavioral discrimination, assortative mating, and speciation. Spatial divergence may be influenced by environmental variables that affect sound transmission. To this end, we studied the geographic relationships between the song characteristics of the Mourning Warbler and environmental characteristics measured with satellite data. Specifically we investigated relationships between bird song characteristics, measured across Canada and across decades, to environmental indicators derived from Landsat data. We will present the processes we employed with ARCGIS Pro for this study.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Investigations on the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems for Collecting Thematic Map Accuracy Assessment Reference data in Complex Natural Environments.
AUTHORS: Benjamin T. Fraser* and Russell G. Congalton

ABSTRACT: With the expansion of modern technologies, remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) are able to capture and analyze data at ever progressing scales. These advances help todays? users create vital land cover and land use (thematic) maps using novel classification methods to represent increasingly complex environments. For these resulting thematic maps to serve as proper decision support tools for research and management, their accuracy must first be evaluated. The methods for assessing thematic accuracy have developed considerably over the years, now advising site-specific multivariate analysis using an error matrix. Despite improved methods of analysis, immense costs and time restraints on the collection of samples used as a standard of comparison for reality, reference data, often limit accuracy assessments. Many projects have high-resolution remote sensing, ground-based sampling, or maps of known accuracy as reference data, with ground-based reference data being the most sound yet costly. The relatively recent proliferation of Unmanned Aerial Systems (i.e., UAS, UAV, or Drone), with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions may help to overcome this challenge. Our research at the University of New Hampshire analyzed first the ability to collect data of sufficient comprehension, in New England Forests. Next, we conducted a pilot study over 377.57 ha of woodlands that achieved 71.43% and 85.71% agreement to ground-based samples under pixel-based and object-based classifications respectively despite noted sources of uncertainty. Future applications and research objectives are briefly discussed to further encourage the use of emerging technologies as tools for providing information at management needed scales.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Mapping Climate and Weather-Induced Vulnerabilities: A Case Study of Majuro Atoll
AUTHORS: Bryanna Weigel

ABSTRACT: The ways in which the island nations of Oceania have or have not been able to cope with the growing number of extreme and hazardous effects of climate change have made the region frequently looked on upon as an example of how other countries plan to address future weather and climatic events in their local regions. This project looks to examine the vulnerabilities to sea-level rise and extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and inundation, of coastal properties – both residential and commercial – on the Majuro Atoll of the Marshall Islands. To map the vulnerabilities experienced at a particular site in the region, this project will utilize data from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) published by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) detailing, at one-meter resolution, the topobathymetric characteristics of Majuro Atoll. The USGS data set consists of data sources dating back to 1944 and as recent as 2016, as well as 20,000 images using Structure from Motion (SfM) Imagery. Elevations calculated in the DEM data set will be used in combination with a georeferenced image base map of the Majuro atoll so that properties on the atoll can be located. Census data collected by the Marshall Islands government will provide key demographic information that will further highlight certain populations’ vulnerability.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Parcel-Based Suitability Analysis of Proposed Zoning Development Changes in Greenfield, MA
AUTHORS: Nathaniel Hussey, Antioch University New England, Keene NH; Steven Lamonde, Antioch University New England, Keene NH

ABSTRACT: To confront the realities of high property taxes and increased pressure to be more business friendly, Greenfield MA is debating amendments to its Zoning By-laws to encourage economic development. The amendments proposed on 14 February 2019 pertain to the Major Development review process, will allow for a larger maximum square footage of gross floor area for future non-residential construction projects in all city districts. To identify parcels in specific districts suitable for development per the proposed amendment, a parcel-based suitability model was developed to map development potential within six focus districts in Greenfield. Using GIS data layers from the Massachusetts GIS database, four submodels were created to account for natural features and built infrastructure on the landscape. Submodels were then weighted and combined to analyse each tax parcel?s overall suitability for development. Additionally, two Zonal Statistic analyses were run to determine the suitability of parcels, based on the slope of the landscape, and district-specific dimensional requirements for open space per parcel. This analysis determines which parcels within the six districts are suitable for development. The conclusions found in this analysis will provide a more holistic interpretation of many of Greenfield?s tax parcels. The findings will assist Greenfield?s Planning Board to more effectively review, evaluate and recommend development proposals. Additionally, the findings will assist the Greenfield Zoning Board of Appeals streamline their deliberation process and decision making on issues of special permits and variances under the Greenfield's Zoning Ordinance.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Runoff Analysis of Proposed Trails in Bellows Falls and Rockingham, Vermont
AUTHORS: Emmy Whistler*, Antioch University New England; Steven Lamonde, Antioch University New England; Joe Frigo, WCoTA

ABSTRACT: The non-profit Windham County Trail Alliance (WCoTA) is proposing to construct and maintain a recreational trail system on two publicly owned properties on Oak Hill in Rockingham and Bellows Falls, Vermont. Due to its geographical proximity to Minard's Pond, the drinking water reservoir for the town of Rockingham and the Village of Bellows Falls, runoff in this area has the potential to be a pollutant to this critical water source. By understanding the geography of runoff along Oak Hill it provides a tool of analysis for the local communities as they undertake projects in the area such as logging or trail building. As manufacturing and other historic industry continues to decline in the area, towns and villages in southern Vermont continue to look for alternative sources of economic security. WCoTA has proposed that outdoor recreation is the future of economic stability in this region and this hydrological analysis allows WCoTA to operate along Oak Hill with an understanding of the region's hydrology. Using the hydrology toolset in ArcMap, this analysis provides an accurate representation of runoff along the Oak Hill ridge line. This analysis benefits the local communities surrounding Oak Hill in a number of ways: trail expansion and construction can be undertaken in a manner that recognizes the importance of maintaining high quality drinking water for the town and looks to limit possible impacts to the regions hydrology and to limit any possibility of pollutants entering Minard's Pond.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Think Outside the Bulb: Modeling Solar Potential in Keene, New Hampshire
AUTHORS: Christopher Klem, Gwendolyn Thayer, Samantha Menke

ABSTRACT: The City of Keene has resolved to transition to 100% renewable energy by the year 2030. The purpose of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of the viability of this ambitious goal. In collaboration with the Keene Energy and Climate Committee, this research analyzes residential solar potential throughout Keene. Critical solar variables of rooftop pitch and orientation, as well as shadows are determined for every residential property in the City. These variables were input into Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a computer-mapping program that reveals which areas in Keene have the highest residential solar potential. Our methodology also includes SPSS statistical analysis to test survey results of 137 Keene State students regarding their knowledge of solar and renewable energy. Results from the GIS analysis and survey research support promising potential for a future in renewable energy for the City of Keene.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Tightening the “Diabetes Belt”
AUTHORS: Katrishia Bell, Eastern Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT: Diabetes, a condition where high amounts of sugar in the blood impairs the body’s ability to process glucose, has become a global concern given the epidemic proportions.  A high percentage of adult diabetics are located in developing countries and the U.S. is no exception.  The “Diabetes Belt” is composed of several states in the southeastern U.S. and is known for high rates of obesity and physical inactivity which are two of the leading contributors.  Given the physical and financial toll associated with diabetes, it’s critical to identify appropriate strategies to effectively reduce diabetes in this area.  Therefore, this analysis evaluated the spatial distribution of diabetes prevalence for the Diabetes Belt and statistically evaluated the influence of physical inactivity and obesity, as well as socioeconomic factors, to explain diabetes prevalence.  Socioeconomic factors considered included income, age, sex, educational attainment, poverty, health insurance, food stamps and poverty, foreign born citizens, race, and employment status.  Clustering of high diabetes prevalence were evident in many counties of Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Tennessee.  The global multivariable regression model indicated physical inactivity, obesity, and all socioeconomic variables except educational attainment were significant in explaining diabetes prevalence (95% confidence interval) yet this model only explained 64% of diabetes prevalence rates in the southeast.  The variability in the socioeconomic and health factors identified suggests the Diabetes Belt would benefit from participating in the CDC’s state and local public health actions which develop prevention strategies which involve environmental interactions, health care systems, and community programs to reduce diabetes.  

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Using ArcGIS to Document Health of Eel Grass Habitats
AUTHORS: Lucy Clay, Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research

ABSTRACT: Citizen-science plays a key role in the global effort to conserve seagrasses such as mangrove habitats and eel grass beds in coastal New England. Students from the Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research has been engaged in this global effort since 2015 and have been using ArcGIS tools over the years to document the location, extent, health, and habitat of eel grass beds in Cohasset waters. Using Collector on mobile devices and ArcGIS Online in the classroom, students have experimented with various ways to illustrate attributes of healthy beds that include, but are not limited to the following: length of shoots, number of shoots, presence of broken shoots, percent tunicate coverage, percent reproductive shoots, sediment characteristics, wasting disease, and presence of epiphytes (algal growth). Many GIS iterations have taken place over the years as students have struggled with methodologies (snorkeling v using GoPros), GPS considerations (above water, below water), and ArcGIS Online analysis tools (interpolation, density). Much has been learned, and students will display latest findings as well as present evidence from EPA stakeholders that their citizen science efforts and GIS applications make a difference to those charged with protecting this vital ecosystem resource. 

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Using ArcGIS to Document Spatial Distribution of Marine Debris
AUTHOR: Beck LaBash, Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research

ABSTRACT: Citizen-science plays a key role in understanding the plastic pollution problem that plagues our oceans. Students from the Cohasset Center for Student Coastal Research have been engaged in this global effort since 2015 and have been using ArcGIS tools over the years to document Marine Debris. Many GIS iterations have taken place over the years as students have struggled with methodologies (snorkeling v using GoPros), GPS considerations (above water, below water), and ArcGIS Online analysis tools (interpolation, density). Students will display latest findings and analyses conducted using ArcGIS Online.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Using Inkscape Software to Produce Disc Golf Course Maps and Signage
AUTHORS: David Scherf, City of Torrington

ABSTRACT: Using freely available orthoimagery and digital elevation data from the State of Connecticut and a couple of long tape measures, this poster shows how the freely available, open-source vector graphics software Inkscape, along with ArcGIS desktop, was used to produce disc golf course maps and signage for the Alvord Park Disc Golf Course, a joint venture of the Tri-State Disc Golf Club and the City of Torrington. The GIS data created during this project was also exported to ArcGIS Online and used to populate a Story Map for the disc golf course.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: Weeding Out Canada Thistle
AUTHORS: Taylor Brown, Eastern Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT: Globally, invasive non-native species have contributed to 40% of animal extinctions over the last 400 years and caused a 5% loss of annual production to the world economy. Canada Thistle is one of the most prevalent, invasive weeds on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land in Minnesota, occurring in 65 to 75% of CRP fields.  The potential economic losses due to further invasion of this plant makes evaluating the current distribution and the potential environmental/biotic factors contributing to the expansion critical for Minnesota.  Therefore, the objective of this study was to spatially and statistically identify the significance of land use and environmental characteristics on the density of Canada Thistle.  Contributors to Canada Thistle invasion included temperature, precipitation, elevation, disturbances (roads, streams, and wildfires) and the presence of other invasive weeds including Common Tansy, European Buckthorn, and Spotted Knapweed. Towns in Minnesota where high and low densities of Canada Thistle clustered were determined and a multivariable regression analysis was performed at the global and local scale to evaluate the relationship of environmental and disturbance factors, as well as the presence of other invasive plants, on Canada Thistle. Results showed that the presence of Common Tansy and the density of wildfires were significant in predicting the density of Canada Thistle.  High densities of Canada Thistle were observed where Common Tansy was present yet in locations with a low density of wildfires.  Thus, fire ecology may be an appropriate management strategy for eradicating Canada Thistle in Minnesota if proven to benefit the entire ecosystem.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: What is the Real Dead Zone?
AUTHORS: Morgan Kuryluk, Eastern Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT: Despite the increased incidence of brain tumors, brain cancer remains relatively uncommon making it the least understood and studied cancer.  However, the increased use and dependence of cellular technology in completing everyday tasks has many questioning the safety of the technology given the emitted radiation and harm to human health. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use a geographic information system to evaluate the spatial distribution of deaths attributed to brain cancer and statistically evaluate whether cell phone towers were significant in predicting the observed brain cancer death rates across the northeastern U.S.  This analysis also considered socioeconomics (income) and air pollution (nitrogen dioxide) as additional predictors of brain cancer distributions.  Clustering of high brain cancer death rates were present in counties along the east coast which included Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey.  Results of the global multivariable regression model indicated that median household income and the number of cell phone towers were significant and explained 55% of the observed brain cancer death rates across the northeast.  In conclusion, despite results of previous studies, the potential harm and increased risk of brain cancer due to cell phones should continue to be studied as results from this study suggest that cell phone towers, and potentially the radiation emitted from the towers, do have an influence on brain cancer.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

8:00am

POSTER: What’s Making It Harder to Breathe in the Southeast?
AUTHORS: Erick Bora, Eastern Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT: Currently COPD is the 4th leading cause of death worldwide and it’s projected to become the 3rd leading cause of death by 2030 unless necessary steps are taken to reduce the underlying risk factors. COPD prevalence is high south of the Ohio River and east of the Mississippi River, yet little research has been conducted to address this issue. The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial distribution of COPD prevalence and statistically determine the significance of socioeconomics, occupation, air quality, physical inactivity, household size, and smoking in predicting rates of COPD. High COPD rates clustered in eastern Kentucky, western Virginia, and southern Missouri which corresponded to areas with high smoking rates. Smokers, healthcare workers, construction workers, age, and percent of people physically inactive were statistically significant in predicting these distributions. Thus, medical professionals and health officials should address these underlying risks to reduce COPD in the U.S.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

9:00am

Welcome, Opening Remarks & Keynote Address by Dr. Mike Palace - "From the Tropics to the Tundra: Geospatial Science as an Integrating Subject"
Keynote Speaker
avatar for Dr. Mike Palace, Ph.D.

Dr. Mike Palace, Ph.D.

Dr. Michael Palace is an environmental scientist focusing on the terrestrial carbon cycle, vegetation dynamics, landscape ecology, and snow characterization using field measurements, remote sensing, and geospatial science. His research ranges from field studies of vegetation structure... Read More →


Tuesday May 14, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
STUDENT CENTER: Mable Brown Room

10:30am

11:00am

PRESENTATION: Leveraging ArcGIS Online for ADA Curb Ramp Inventories
AUTHORS: Kristina Sargent* - VHB_x000D_; Dale Abbott*, GISP - VHB

ABSTRACT: In the Fall of 2018, VHB assisted the Rhode Department of Transportation (RIDOT) in conducting an evaluation of their State-owned curb ramps to assess ADA compliance within the State. RIDOT had previously developed a comprehensive paper-based form to support prior evaluations. However, that information was difficult to manage, required office manual input into spreadsheets, and lacked spatial coordinates. Using Esri's ArcGIS Online Platform, VHB replicated the paper form with customized smart forms using Survey123, captured GPS locations using Collector for ArcGIS, and leveraged Operations Dashboard to track the status of the field data collection. Additionally, Operations Dashboard was used to develop an Esri Story Map of Dashboards for RIDOT staff, providing valuable insight on curb ramp locations. This presentation will provide an overview of the ADA curb ramp inventory and demo the configuration of Survey123 and Operations Dashboard. This presentation will provide an overview of the ADA Curb Ramp inventory, and detail the Esri solutions implemented within the project.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

11:00am

PRESENTATION: U.S. Decennial 2020 Census: Early Nonresponse Follow Up and College Student Enumeration
AUTHORS: Cynthia H. Gillham, Geographer, U.S. Census Bureau

ABSTRACT: During the 2010 Census, Operations Staff in the Local Census Offices conducted Early Nonresponse Followup (NRFU) to enumerate college students while they were still in school, living in shared off-campus housing. For 2020, the U.S. Decennial Census is formally operationalizing this effort. The intent of the Early NRFU operation is to enumerate college students attending traditional universities and living in shared residences off campus, before they potentially move at the end of the Spring semester in 2020. Geographers at the Census Bureau are working together and with State Data Centers to determine which geographic areas Early NRFU will cover._x000D_
1. Developing a universe of schools that are likely to have students living nearby in shared off-campus housing._x000D_
2. Identifying the geographic area around those schools that fit selected housing and demographic criteria indicating the presence of college students._x000D_
Regional geographers are using ArcMap 10.5.1 for Desktop to review Early NRFU areas within map package files (.mpk) during their interactive review.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

11:00am

PRESENTATION: Utilizing ArcGIS Online to Inventory Historical Resources
AUTHORS: Simon Corson*, Town of Amherst New Hampshire

ABSTRACT: This presentation explains how the Town of Amherst, New Hampshire has utilized ArcGIS Online to support the Amherst Historic District Commission (HDC) and Amherst Heritage Commission (HC). The HDC is a regulatory board responsible for overseeing 316 properties. The HC is an advisory board charged with inventorying historical and cultural resources, as well as assist property owners in preservation efforts._x000D_
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To assist the HDC, Amherst's Community Development Department created a map that makes the National Register Nomination Form tabular, shares basic assessing information, includes all past HDC applications, Certificates of Approval/Denial as attachments, and visualizes building footprints and parcel data provided by the Nashua Regional Planning Commission. The HDC uses this map during public hearings to explain their findings to the public and to do basic analysis. For example, when the HDC is deliberating about setbacks from character defining features, they may use ArcGIS Online tools to get a general understanding of sight distance, public view, etc. _x000D_
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For the HC, the Community Development Department created a web application in ArcGIS Online to share the Town's heritage sites documented in the Heritage Resource Survey. The Heritage Resource Survey was produced by Elizabeth Durfee Hengen in 2009 through a grant from the National Park Service and in partnership with the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. The HC uses the 2009 Survey as the format for the web application, while adding relevant texts and photos to existing and new heritage sites as appropriate.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge

11:00am

ESRI PRESENTATION: Esri Update: ArcGIS 10.7, ArcGIS Pro 2.3, and more!
AUTHORS: Matt Deal & Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: Account Management and Technical Staff will review new/key capabilities in ArcGIS 10.7, ArcGIS Pro 2.3, ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Urban, ArcGIS Indoors, the NEW ArcGIS Developer Program, Apps, and more.  Many of these topics will be covered in more detail in Esri sessions later in the program.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mable Brown Room
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

11:00am

(WORKSHOP) ArcGIS Pro Fundamentals {advance registration required; space is limited}
PRESENTER: Krithica Kantharaj, ESRI

DESCRIPTION: ArcGIS Pro is a project-based desktop GIS for the GIS Professional. With ArcGIS Pro, you can view, explore, analyze, edit, and share your maps and data. This workshop will help familiarize you with ArcGIS Pro concepts, such as storing your work in projects, using the ribbon, and utilizing new tools for visualizing data. Sign up for this workshop to get started with ArcGIS Pro.

Note: to sign up for this workshop, you must register for it through the online registration site.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
SCIENCE CENTER: GIS Lab

11:30am

PRESENTATION: ArcGIS Online workflows and best management practises
AUTHORS: Chandreyee Lahiri*, MA Dept. of Conservation & Recreation (DCR)

ABSTRACT: Robert Burns had it right with 'The best laid schemes of mice and men, often go awry'. The poet might have well been alluding to landmines in GIS data development and maintenance. The buffet of ESRI ArcGIS Online methods for data collection and querying, are predicated on thorough and efficient workflows and long-views to glean the most out of the technologies. The worst returns on time and resources invested in data come from incompletely visioned data schema and un-tested workflows._x000D_
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This presentation will focus on soup-to-nuts workflows involving desktop data schema design, using Collector app for fieldwork and Web app builder/Operations dashboard. Workflows are aimed at creating data sets, maintaining them over time (including history) and developing end user products (maps, apps, reports etc) to leverage the data created. It will also touch on the tips in the training and support for different levels of users to best execute goals._x000D_
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Case studies used to illustrate workflows derive from natural resource management. This includes: Streetlights, Rooftops, Playgrounds, Coastal vegetation, Storm Damage, Management Regions etc._x000D_
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At the Dept. of Conservation & Recreation, we work continually on evolving new methodologies to serve all levels and types of users involved in managing the Commonwealths resources, both natural and human-made.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge

11:30am

PRESENTATION: Leveraging Advanced GIS Technology on Municipal LED Street Light Replacement Projects.
AUTHORS: Lauren Sutherland* - VHB_x000D_; Dale Abbott* GISP - VHB

ABSTRACT: Municipalities across the country are replacing their high-pressure sodium (HPS) street lights with more efficient light-emitting diode (LED) fixtures. VHB is leveraging the latest web GIS and mobile data collection technology in support of LED street light retrofits projects throughout NH and ME. This presentation will identify how Esri's ArcGIS Online Platform is used to conduct the field audit process, demonstrate how web mapping is used as a system of engagement between the municipality and the contractor, and illustrate how administrative dashboards can be used to track the entire LED retrofit process. Key Technology: Collector for ArcGIS, Operations Dashboard, and ArcGIS Online.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

11:30am

PRESENTATION: Understanding Geospatial Accuracy Standards
AUTHORS: Ted Covill, WSP USA Inc

ABSTRACT: What are accuracy Standards? The U.S. Bureau of the Budget published the United Stated National Map Accuracy Standards in the 1940's. These standards were updated through-out the 1940's but remained unchanged until the 1990's when the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) published the ASPRS Accuracy Standards for Large-Scale Maps. The ASPRS Accuracy Standard was based more on real world positioning accuracy rather than an accuracy that is based on paper maps. Over the years new standards have been published by other agencies such as Federal Geodetic Data Committee, FEMA and the ASPRS to reflect the advances and introduction of new technologies. In 2014, the ASPRS introduced their new standard with the intent of condensing and override previous digital geospatial standards. These standards are often confusing and misunderstood. This presentation will attempt to explain the differences between the standards and how the standards relate to each other. We will discuss how the accuracy standards relate to the current data sets_x000D_being utilized in the geospatial community such as orthophotography, planimetric mapping, Digital Terrain Models (DTM), contours, LiDAR and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS, A.K.A. drones).

Tuesday May 14, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

12:00pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: ArcGIS Enterprise: Architecture and Configurations
AUTHORS: Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Enterprise provides you with GIS functionality to map, analyze, and manage geospatial content and location-enabled data through a Web GIS deployed on your infrastructure. Whether you are just starting out with the product, migrating from an older ArcGIS for Server configuration, or interested in learning more, this session is for you. Topics will range from an overview of the base deployment to advanced analytical capabilities and product functionality.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mable Brown Room
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

12:00pm

PRESENTATION: ArcGIS Online Web App?s for Project Management
AUTHORS: Jodie Gosselin, GISP*, Dawood Engineering

ABSTRACT: This presentation will demonstrate the ways that Dawood Engineering is using ArcGIS Online Web Applications to give a competitive edge in communicating our projects to our clients. We will present various examples of Story Maps, Operations Dashboards, Field Collection tools, and Web Maps, that we use to manage projects for our transportation, energy, and asset management clients. These tools are used in a variety of ways to increase project efficiencies and communicate in real-time with our clients.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge

12:00pm

PRESENTATION: Digitizing Municipal Transportation Workflows
AUTHORS: Quinn Molloy, MassDOT GIS

ABSTRACT: MassDOT is adding the new Road Inventory Submission Application (RISA) to the suite of municipal tools available on geoDOT. With this addition, we hope to inspire creative new ways for agencies to develop and maintain data. RISA allows local governments to edit their road data online, greatly improving the efficiency and accuracy of local data while lending transparency to a historically opaque process. MassDOT staff have used the debut of the new software to engage with communities on how they use GIS today, and which of their processes could benefit from the centralized geospatial infrastructure afforded to users with geoDOT access. It is the goal of the agency to continue to better connect local staff with the resources they need and creating a collaborative environment for all levels of government in the transportation sector.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

12:00pm

PRESENTATION: Helping others around the world Using OpenStreetMap
AUTHORS: Celeste Reynolds, Mashpee Middle-High School, Mashpee, MA

ABSTRACT: OpenStreetMap is frequently called the "Wikipedia for maps" because anyone with a computer and internet connection can add, edit, and contribute to this worldwide, public map. Like Wikipedia, OpenStreetMap data is free, open source and no special software is needed. Because of this, OpenStreetMap is a superb tool for teaching geography interactively as well as global digital citizenship. It is easy to use, and free of charge, and most of all, it is rewarding for students making it an unparalleled educational tool which can help people locally as well as globally. Students can begin to help organizations like the Red Cross, USAID, United Nations, various NGO's as well as local organizations to collect data that will allow them to create maps that will serve the people more efficiently and effectively. In addition, students can begin to understand the network involved which helps people who are in vulnerable places around the world to make more informed decisions for their community to improve the quality of life.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

12:30pm

Lunch
Tuesday May 14, 2019 12:30pm - 1:45pm
STUDENT CENTER

1:15pm

Keene State College Campus Tree Mapping Project, Applications and Tour
Tour of unique campus trees and use of the qr code tags and application that accompany the project.  A QR Code scanner application on your phone will enhance this tour. Learn more at https://arborscope.com/mapDisplay.cfm?id=0FCBC7

Led by Bud Winsor, Assistant Director Physical Plant - Grounds

Tuesday May 14, 2019 1:15pm - 1:45pm
STUDENT CENTER: 1st Floor Lobby (Appian Way Entrance)

1:45pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: ArcGIS Solutions for Economic Development
AUTHORS: Krithica Kantharaj, Esri

ABSTRACT: Economic growth and development are key to the success and sustainability of communities.  Local governments and organizations face numerous challenges in meeting the needs of their changing communities, often with limited staff and GIS capabilities. Governments are continually looking for ways to attract new businesses, jobs and talent to their area. ArcGIS provides the most comprehensive spatial and demographic solution for identifying needs in a community, recruiting or expanding businesses, and much more. In this session, you will learn how you can use ArcGIS Community Analyst to make informed decisions about population, resource allocation, policy planning, and communities by combining your data with Esri Demographic data, maps, infographics, and reports.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 1:45pm - 2:15pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

1:45pm

PRESENTATION: ArcGIS for MS4 Stormwater Mapping: NHDOT Approach
AUTHORS: Stephanie Pelletier, VHB & Dale Abbott* GISP – VHB

ABSTRACT: The Environmental Protection Agency released a new MS4 Stormwater General Permit for New Hampshire that became effective on July 1, 2018. The General Permit requires the DOT to develop updated maps of their stormwater system and related outfalls.  A key new requirement includes linking stormwater outfalls with the water quality impairments listed on the State?s 303 (d) list (impaired waters). VHB has been assisting the NH Department of Transportation in meeting the MS4 General Permit requirements. Specifically, VHB has developed a geodatabase of all NHDOT Operated outfalls with the NH MS4 area. In addition to compiling the geodatabase, VHB is leveraging Collector for ArcGIS to support field investigations, performing spatial analysis in ArcPro to estimate roadway drainage and combine outfalls with impaired waters data. Additionally, VHB is utilizing Operations Dashboard to track outfall inspections and business intelligence on various outfalls statistics such as receiving waters and water quality impairment.                          

Tuesday May 14, 2019 1:45pm - 2:15pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 102

1:45pm

PRESENTATION: GIS Software for Mapping Tranquility in UK Protected Areas
AUTHORS: Christopher Brehme*, Keene State College; JC Woodward, Keene State College

ABSTRACT: The United Kingdom mandates the protection of tranquil spaces in its National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. This mandate ensures that these places offer benefits for human health and well being, in addition to environmental protection. To support park planners, we collaborated with colleagues in the UK to develop a GIS tool known as BETER (Broadly Engaging with Tranquillity, Easier and Refined). Written in Python, BETER is a software extension to Esri ArcGIS that automatically prepares and combines more than 25 distinct GIS layers to identify areas with the lowest sound and visual interference. Many of the processes involve viewshed and soundshed analysis using fine-scale digital elevation models, which can be computationally intensive. However, the program is divided in two parts: Assembler and MapMaker. Assembler can be run just once to create the output layers required by MapMaker. This user-friendly tool allows even novice GIS users to produce maps based on self-selected weights, in order to highlight areas most at risk to visual and audio intrusions.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 1:45pm - 2:15pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

1:45pm

PRESENTATION: Visual impact assessment for proposed wind farm
AUTHORS: Joseph Hakam*, ERM; Brett Shaver, ERM

ABSTRACT: This presentation will provide an overview of a visual impact assessment for a proposed wind farm and how GIS was utilized throughout the lifecycle of the project. ERM was involved in the planning and permitting of a wind farm and performed viewshed analysis on existing turbines and potential turbine locations to determine the visual impact of the new wind turbine installation. The viewshed tool is a powerful analytic tool that determines line-of-sight from a ground raster to one or more elevated points. In addition to the standard viewshed utilizing Bare-Earth Digital Elevation Models, ERM acquired additional GIS datasets in order to produce an adjusted model that accounted for the screening effect of forested areas. Field teams used this data on mobile devices in order to ground-truth potential impacts compared to sensitive resource areas.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 1:45pm - 2:15pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

1:45pm

(WORKSHOP) Distribute Your Python Tools to ArcGIS Pro Users {advance registration required; space is limited}
PRESENTER: Jason Wise, Terracon

DESCRIPTION: ArcGIS Pro's Python Package Manager makes it easy to install code from the open-source community, but what about your own code? We'll use conda to package our code, make our own distribution channel, and make the channel available to the Package Manager. We'll see how easy it is to update the code and provide new versions to users. We'll briefly cover modern coding topics such as repositories, collaboration, and best practices for code structure and documentation. Bring a computer with ArcGIS Pro if you can, or you can just watch.

ArcGIS Desktop/Pro, Programming (Java - Python - R etc.)

Note: to sign up for this workshop, you must register for it through the online registration site. 

Tuesday May 14, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm
SCIENCE CENTER: GIS Lab

2:15pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: Supercharging your maps with Arcade
AUTHORS: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Arcade is an expression language that can be used across the ArcGIS platform. Whether writing simple scripts to control how features are rendered or expressions to control label text, Arcade provides a simple scripting syntax to deliver these capabilities. Gain a deeper understanding of what Arcade is (and what it isn't) and how to get started putting it to use in your projects.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

2:15pm

PRESENTATION: Advanced Tips and Tricks for Leveraging ArcGIS On-line and Survey123 for Mobile Collection
AUTHORS: Larry Spraker, VHB

ABSTRACT: VHB has been pushing the technical boundaries to get the most out of Survey123 and ArcGIS Online (AGOL) for mobile data collection. This presentation will share many advanced tips and tricks used both with Survey123 as well as AGOL to address several challenging use cases.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 102

2:15pm

PRESENTATION: Using Drones to Inspect Stormwater Infrastructure for MS4 Permit Compliance
AUTHORS: Josephine Hatton*, Comprehensive Environmental Inc.; Eileen Pannetier, Comprehensive Environmental Inc.

ABSTRACT: Under the terms of the NPDES Stormwater Permit Program, most municipalities are responsible for the regular inspection and maintenance of their stormwater system. The Control Measures stipulated by the permit include regular monitoring of post-construction runoff and routine, ongoing pollution prevention and "good housekeeping." This burden is time-consuming and costly in terms of personnel and equipment, especially in light of the fact that in any given year, the majority of stormwater structures will not require any major repairs or maintenance. A program of systematic flyovers and inspection by a small unmanned aerial system (sUAS), or drone, dramatically reduces the cost and the time required to perform these inspections and allows the quick prioritization of structures for closer inspection or repair. The information collected can be managed and maintained in GIS. We will discuss the advantages offered by the use of sUAS technology for this purpose, along with some caveats regarding logistical, legal, and privacy considerations.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

2:15pm

PRESENTATION: Using GIS to identify conservation hotspots: Combining regional data with local values
AUTHORS: Marcia Moreno-Baez, Strafford Regional Planning Commission; Kyle Pimental, Strafford Regional Planning Commission; John Wallace, Conservation Commission Town of Barrington, NH; Charlie Briggs, Conservation Commission Town of Barrington, NH; Anne Melvin, Conservation Commission Town of Barrington, NH

ABSTRACT: New Hampshire cities and towns are regularly challenged with balancing economic development opportunities with land protection efforts and sustainability goals. Our region in southeastern NH, is a great example where many municipalities take great pride in their sense of place and rely heavily on natural resources for recreation, tourism, and quality of life. One of the tools that provides the basis for local land conservation planning is a Natural Resources Inventory (NRI), which identifies existing natural resource and their geographic distribution; however, they do not always support the arguments needed to encourage investment decisions made by governing bodies. In order to overcome these limitations, we integrated a participatory spatial planning process to value our natural resources and conservation priorities. We defined a list of eight natural resources criteria important for conservation and they were weighted based on input from members of the Barrington's conservation commission to generate a hotspot map for conservation values. The analysis was performed for the entire southeastern region using model builder in ArcGIS ESRI 10.5. These hotspots represent the richest and most important ecosystems based on local values. This effort can be replicated in other regions where communities and planners can integrate the local values for conservation and use the spatial query and mapping functions of GIS to analyze the existing situation in the town or city. Hotspots for conservation can help prioritize conservation investment and inform local land use planning efforts to protect ecosystem services and support economic development and conservation efforts.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

2:45pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: The New ArcGIS for Developers Program
AUTHORS: Jim Barry, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS for Developers is a complete developer experience designed to be simple and flexible. Joining ArcGIS for Developers gives you access to all of the software and resources you need to build, manage, and deploy your solutions quickly and cost-effectively.  Recently, Esri had unveiled a new pricing and deployment model that will open up the ArcGIS Platform for more developers than ever.  If you are an existing developer, considering ArcGIS as a platform, or just curious, this session is for you.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

2:45pm

PRESENTATION: Comparing call data and drive time areas to confirm location efficiency & Emergency response coverage
AUTHORS: Will Schoefmann, City of Keene, NH

ABSTRACT: The City of Keene NH owns a second Fire Station in a West Keene neighborhood. The property was acquired from the State/Army National Guard a year ago and the City is considering a number of options with regards to the property including: Renovations, Demolition and Reconstruction or Relocation. The first phase of the project was to geolocate nearly four (4) years of call data which was conducted thoroughly. Then the data was analyzed to find average call response times, locations most frequently responded to, types of calls most frequently responded to and to visualize patterns from the current site based on that information. To better help the decision making team visualize the call data – the information was published to ArcGIS Online and a Dashboard was created for each year’s worth of data. ArcGIS Pro was utilized to model drive time areas for both Station 2 and Central fire to help the team understand travel time coverages. Response time areas were then developed to help cross check the drive time models which the presentation describes in detail.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 102

2:45pm

PRESENTATION: Quabbin to Cardigan Regional Conservation Plan Update
AUTHORS: Rick Brackett*, The Monadnock Conservancy_x000D_; Brian Hotz, Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests_x000D_; Dan Sundquist, GreenFire GIS_x000D_; Pete Steckler, NH Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

ABSTRACT: The Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership (Q2C) was convened by the Society for the Protection of NH Forests (Forest Society) in 2004 to focus regional conservation strategies in western New Hampshire and north-central Massachusetts. Originally comprised of 27 agency and organizational stakeholders, the group worked together to generate a plan for strategic conservation stretching from the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts to Mt. Cardigan in New Hampshire. The Q2C was the first bi-state strategic conservation plan in New England at the time. The strategic conservation plan was released in 2006, with discrete conservation focus areas (CFAs) that reflect the highest priorities for conservation within the Q2C interest area. While this plan served the Q2C partnership well in the intervening years, some of the data used in the planning process is now out-of-date, and important new data on climate change resilience and connectivity has recently become available. Therefore, the Forest Society and other key partners initiated an effort to update the Q2C strategic conservation plan. The group decided on a range of natural resources for inclusion in a GIS co-occurrence map produced to identify locations where multiple resource features are co-located. The data from the co-occurrence map is analyzed in GIS to delineate CFAs. How these CFAs work to provide habitat connectivity is a newer branch of conservation planning science. With new data released by The Nature Conservancy in 2016 on climate change resilience and connectivity, the update of the Q2C conservation plan is at the cutting edge of conservation science and planning.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

2:45pm

PRESENTATION: Subsurface Utility Mapping with ArcGIS
AUTHORS: Ethan Dickson, DGT Associates; John Lloyd, DGT Associates; Michael Twohig*, DGT Associates

ABSTRACT: DGT Associates has been integrating ArcGIS into it's Subsurface Utility Mapping (SUM) workflow in order to increase efficiency and quality of data collected. Accurately mapping underground facilities is most challenging due to the simple fact that they are typically not observable. The path to delivering the most accurate portrayal of the subsurface environment requires a combination of research and various field work investigation techniques. DGT's SUM team has found ArcGIS to be beneficial in all phases of the process. Georeferencing plans in ArcMap helps the team "set the stage" before commencing data collection work in the field. Often times, a wide variety of plans from multiple sources, of varying accuracies, are required on a single project. ArcMap helps keep the plans organized and identifies areas of concern. While in the field, Collector is used to survey the data and populate crucial attributes. After completion of the field collection, the resulting data can be analyzed, shared and viewed in various formats, helping us meet the needs of the end user.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

3:15pm

3:30pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: ArcGIS Urban: A GIS-based Planning Tool
AUTHORS: Mark Scott, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Urban, a new collection of web-based and desktop tools, is much more than a product to help you design, manage and measure the impact of your plans. It is a new way of collaborating across departments and agencies to make the right decisions for the community. See how this new product can help planners streamline plan creation, visualize current projects, and support public- and private-sector collaboration.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

3:30pm

PRESENTATION: Location Intelligence for Solving Tough Problems
AUTHORS: Dan Steiner, Penn State University & Orion Mapping

ABSTRACT: Location Intelligence starts with a question. What location-based opportunity or challenge are we trying to solve? Using US Census demographics, who can benefit from development in 2019 Opportunity Zones? Where are optimal sites for a business to expand stores, warehousing, restaurants, or hotels? Location Intelligence adds a previously unappreciated advantage to effective decision making; integrating an organization's internal data with relevant geospatial information. Location Intelligence assists to visualize patterns and evaluate choices through digital mapping, dynamic comparisons, and operational dashboards. This presentation demonstrates an interesting method of geospatial analysis, Location Intelligence with Esri Tapestry, US Census bureau demographics, and current New England business segmentation.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

3:30pm

PRESENTATION: Utilizing the Soil Survey (SSURGO) Database and Development Toolbox
AUTHORS: Nate Ward*, Terracon; Ian Sleeper*, Terracon

ABSTRACT: The soil survey provided by the national resources conservation service is a powerful data set of surveyed soils across the nation. It can provide crucial information pertaining to geologic conditions. We will discuss how SSURGO and the corresponding NRCS development toolbox can be used to create meaningful data and products.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

3:30pm

(WORKSHOP) ArcGIS Pro Fundamentals {advance registration required; space is limited}
PRESENTER: Krithica Kantharaj, ESRI

DESCRIPTION: ArcGIS Pro is a project-based desktop GIS for the GIS Professional. With ArcGIS Pro, you can view, explore, analyze, edit, and share your maps and data. This workshop will help familiarize you with ArcGIS Pro concepts, such as storing your work in projects, using the ribbon, and utilizing new tools for visualizing data. Sign up for this workshop to get started with ArcGIS Pro.

Note: to sign up for this workshop, you must register for it through the online registration site. 

Tuesday May 14, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
SCIENCE CENTER: GIS Lab

4:00pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: GIS Data Analytics with ArcGIS Insights
AUTHORS: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: See how Insights for ArcGIS works in concert with ArcGIS Enterprise and ArcGIS Online to make interactive and exploratory analysis fast and intuitive. We will discuss ways to apply the web tool to various analyses, and learn to add, model, and analyze data as well as share results.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

4:00pm

PRESENTATION: A 3D Printout of the Pocantico River Watershed
AUTHORS: Peggy Minnis, Pace University; Richard Kline, Pace University

ABSTRACT: The Pocantico River watershed drains into the Hudson River and sees floods in major storms. We created a 3D scene in ArcScene, which piqued the interest of a computer scientist who had just acquired a 9' x 9' 3D printer. This covers the process of going from the 3D scene to the file for the printer and how it became a 42' long sculpture and how images can be projected on it.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

4:00pm

PRESENTATION: New Land Cover Products for New England States
AUTHORS: Nate Herold, NOAA Office for Coastal Management; Jamie Carter*, Lynker/CSS on contract for NOAA OCM

ABSTRACT: Current, accurate land cover and change information is a common foundational data set that can be used to address a wide range of management issues, from flood risk and natural infrastructure to policy evaluation and land use planning. Knowing what exists on the ground gives planners more information, and the better that data, the better our understanding. For almost two decades, NOAA?s Office for Coastal Management has been producing standardized, 30 meter resolution land cover and change information for the coastal United States through its Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). More recently, NOAA has been working to establish an operational higher resolution land cover product line, bringing the national C-CAP framework to the local level and allowing for more site-specific, local applications through the production of higher resolution (1 meter) land cover data. This product is not yet publically available everywhere, so NOAA is concurrently developing a hybrid (10 meter) land cover product that leverages the detail of the 1 meter, automated products but at a scale where errors from those products won?t impact their use. This presentation will highlight the methods of recent data development efforts, showcase recently released products in Massachusetts, discuss progress in Connecticut and Rhode Island, and lay out the vision for ongoing efforts to expand both high resolution and hybrid data products throughout New England.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

4:30pm

ESRI PRESENTATION: ArcGIS HUB: Engaging the Community
AUTHORS: Tom Schwartzman, Esri

ABSTRACT: ArcGIS Hub helps communities meet the goals of their initiatives faster and more effectively. Built on the ArcGIS platform, ArcGIS Hub maximizes data sharing, communication, analysis, and collaboration. In this session we will learn how ArcGIS Hub allows us to organize ArcGIS websites, initiatives, community events, and web applications to engage your stakeholders in focused ways and drive sustained awareness campaigns and participation in your communities.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Madison Lounge
  • Tags/Key Words Esri

4:30pm

PRESENTATION: Using GIS to Evaluate Tree Canopy Loss in the City of Cambridge
AUTHORS: Jeff Amero, City of Cambridge

ABSTRACT: The City of Cambridge has been experiencing a significant loss of tree canopy over the past 10 years. Reports to the City by consultants have led to a tree protection ordinance which requires all private landowners to obtain a permit to cut down a tree, a creation of an Urban Forestry Master Plan and a citizen task force to create a strategic plan to evaluate, maintain and expand the City's urban forest canopy. This presentation will look at the role of spatial datasets, GIS based software and analysis using several techniques including interpretation of LiDAR data, raster analysis, 3D shadow studies, and tree inventories using an asset management system. We will also look at how both information and misinformation has played a role in the decision-making process.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
SCIENCE CENTER: Room 101

4:30pm

PRESENTATION: UX for GIS: Leveraging UX to Create Successful Web Applications
AUTHORS: Nicholas Ranalli*, CDM Smith

ABSTRACT: Your team has access to data and an idea for a web application. The money is spent on resources to design and build the application, and it is deployed and rolled out as planned. However, people aren't using it, and those that do don't seem to be happy with it. Some go as far as saying that it's not "user-friendly." Web application solutions can't rely on data and an idea alone, especially the assumptions that inherently come along with them. An application created by relying only on GIS application templates, features and services won't necessarily meet the needs and goals of its end-users; it may not even be usable by those who aren't domain experts, or technologically or geographically-savvy. This presentation will introduce the field of user experience (UX) and how it's principles and practices can be utilized. It will illuminate the importance of the user's perspective and human factors that play a role in any digital experience. The audience will come away with both an understanding of how UX can be applied to creating geospatial applications, as well as actionable steps to bring UX into their work right away.

Tuesday May 14, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
STUDENT CENTER: Mountain View Room

5:00pm

NEURISA “Mappy Hour” Networking Social & Poster Prizes
Join your NEARC colleagues for some snacks and a social networking opportunity after the conference. All attendees welcome, and the winners of the poster competition will be announced!

Ramunto’s Brickoven Pizza
176 Main Street, Keene, NH 03431
https://ramuntos.com/keene-nh

Tuesday May 14, 2019 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Offsite: Ramunto’s Brickoven Pizza 176 Main St, Keene, NH 03431, USA